At the moment there are three Bearded Vulture eggs in the Centro de Críah of the FCQ, near Zaragoza.

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February 2014

When out of one of these eggs a chick is born, feeding starts with Bearded Vulture puppets, in dead silence, so that it never gets attached to human beings. After some weeks, when the chick is strong enough to be exposed to outside conditions, it is transported to a nest in a cage close to the Vulture feeding place in the National Park Ordesa y Monte Perdido, high up in the Pyrenees.

The chick can see his next of kin, the Bearded Vultures there behave in the freedom of the field, pruning, fighting for lumps of meat, waiting for their turn to get a bone, etc.The man or woman of the FCQ who will continue feeding the chick with puppets, struggles up the mountain with butcher’s offal and bones, and stays there several days with the chick to feed it, again without being seen or heard. Then another will walk up with new food, to relieve him or her. The relieved person will get his or her rest in the biological station Monte Perdido at Revilla. Continue reading “At the moment there are three Bearded Vulture eggs in the Centro de Críah of the FCQ, near Zaragoza.”

New step for the conservation of the Bearded Vulture in Europe

Lammergier pop en jong op natuurgetrouw nest | F. Marquez

Lammergier pop en jong op natuurgetrouw nest | F. Marquez First hand rearing of a bearded vulture in human isolation inducing behavioural learning by natural imprint. Continue reading “New step for the conservation of the Bearded Vulture in Europe”